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Updating Door Furniture in a Period Property

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Updating Door Furniture in a Period Property

Period properties are packed full of features, from big bay windows and character-filled coving to high ceilings and eye-catching skirting, there’s plenty that homeowners will look to keep and work with when redecorating. 

So, what about updating your door furniture? Whether you’re redesigning the whole room or simply adding some finishing touches to your existing decor, it will serve your space well to pay homage to the Victorian and Edwardian styles with appropriate door knobs and door handles.

To give you an idea of some of the styles that will make your interior sing, our More4Doors team have picked out five designs that will make your decorative doors stand out for all of the right reasons. 

Antique Brass & Bronze Handles

The perfect way to complete your period property’s interior design? Antique brass and bronze handles!

Designs such as the Antique Brass Parisian Door Handles on Rose (pictured) are the ideal means of adding plenty of warmth, character and a touch of colour to your doors. 

This design looks slightly worn and well-loved but no less eye-catching; a stunning addition to any interior door that’s sure to bring out the best in those period features.


Brass Door Handles

If something a little shinier is on the agenda, how about brass handles

We love the exquisite Italian-designed and manufactured Da Tonoli Accera Door Handles in polished brass, pictured here on the left. 

These stunning handles give a nod to the contemporary and Art Deco, all while remaining in-keeping with the warmth, colours and decorative lines and angles of period doors, coving and skirting.

Antique Black Door Handles

Monochrome simply never goes out of fashion, so investing in some antique black door handles is a foolproof idea and extremely aesthetically pleasing to boot. 

Designs such as the Wentworth Antique Black Door Handles (pictured) are incredibly easy on the eye, but they also add plenty of texture to your decor too. 

What’s more, with lockable thumb twist and keyhole models available, these period handles are ideal for bathrooms and guest rooms that might require a little more privacy. 


Pewter Door Handles

Pewter handles and doorknobs are a match made in heaven for period style properties. 

The dappled surface of pewter has a dramatic effect in any period-style interior design, but that’s not to say that this age-old material can’t be capitalised on in a captivating contemporary design. 

Models such as the Pewter Material Ball Shape Mortice Door Knob appear clean and modern while effortlessly making the most of pewter’s naturally pleasing, tactile appearance.

Decorative Centre Doorknobs

What handles or knobs to use on Victorian style doors?

A Victorian style door works well with most period style door knobs and handles. Look for designs that include a backplate and a wave shaped handle. Beehive and reeded door knobs also compliment Victorian style doors. When choosing a finish, opt for brass or black.

 

Who’s to say that your door furniture placement has to be conventional? Decorative centre doorknobs provide an amazing symmetrical aesthetic that looks great in period properties.

From smooth to angular designs and polish to satin finishes, there are plenty of options available to match your style and add bucket loads of wow factor to your decor. 

Products such as the Polished Brass Centre Door Knob pictured here look befitting for a regal crown, so why not make it the jewel in the centre of your period door design? 


If you found our guide helpful, why not browse the More4Doors blog page where you’ll find everything from how to’s on DIY to handy style advice.

Related Articles:

How To Replace Door Hinges

Door Handle FAQs

Matching Your Door Handles To Your Decor

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  • Craig Scully